Lower Columbia Basin Audubon Society

Birding Locations: Yakima River Delta, Kennewick and Finley, Benton County, Washington

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The Great Washington State Birding Trail Map for the Sun and Sage Loop is available from Audubon Washington. The map offers more birding locations and information for birding in South Central Washington.


YakimaRiver Delta
, between Richland and Kennewick, Benton County, Washington
click here for interactive Google Map
Coordinates: 46.237966,-119.227839

This delta, where the Yakima flows into the Columbia provides good birding any time. Shorebirding is exceptional when water levels are low, especially late March-May and again August-early November. This is a great place for winter waterfowl.Sightings have included Marbled Godwit, Red Knot, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Ruff and Red Phalarope - all unusual.

The delta waters can be seen from the dike area behind the Benton-Franklin bus barns, from Bateman Island, and from Columbia Point.

See alsoBirder's Guide to Washington,Page 347


Bateman Island / Bateman Marina,
between Richland and Kennewick, Benton County, Washington Bateman Island Sign
click here for Google Map
Coordinates: 46.238136,-119.225779

Bird walks of Bateman Island are guided by LCBAS ten months each year (Sept. through June). The island is accessible only by foot or bicycle via a causeway. The causeway, with the Yakima delta to the west and the Columbia River to the east, is a prime vantage point for viewing shorebirds and waterfowl. A circular trail system covers most of the island.

Any species of bird can possibly be seen, migrants and vagrants. Although many large trees were destroyed in recent fires, look carefully for owls in the densest areas.

See alsoBirder's Guide to Washington,Page 347

One canoe of the Lewis & Clark expedition ventured as far as Bateman Island, while the expeditioncamped at the present site of Sacajawea Park. Theresident Native Americans told the party of the other river, the Tapteal (now called the Yakima), coming in from the west.

For more historical information about Bateman Island, you may wish to visitThe English River website's page
Bateman Island which relates this area to Lewis & Clarks' route.


Columbia Park, Kennewick, Benton County, Washington
click here for Google Map
Coordinates: 46.228778,-119.184666

This park is a great place to spend a few minutes or explore for hours. Walk the Audubon Nature Trail, cruise the river, explore riparian habitats. Search for migrants or in winter look for mixed flocks of over-wintering birds. Waterfowl, loons and grebes are present in winter. Seach American Coot flocks for diving birds.

Lampson Pit area is good to look for winter flocks that include Brown Creeper. The Family Fishing Pondhas a good assortment of diving ducks in winter (Hooded Merganser, Ring-necked Duck, etc.). Scan wigeons for Eurasian Wigeon. From the shoreline,scope the far shore and search among coots and ducks for unusual divers such as scoters, Long-tailed Duck, Red-necked Grebes. TheRod Coler Audubon Nature Trail is good for migrants and winter sparrows.

See also Birder's Guide to Washington,Page 349.


Two Rivers State Park, Finley, Benton County, Washington
click here for Google Map
Coordinates: 46.188685,-119.051456

The 200 acres of Two Rivers County Park occupies a mile of Columbia River shoreline across from the confluence of the Columbia and Snake Rivers and Sacajawea State Park. Access is from Finley Road east of Kennewick.

Thewide variety of habitatsprovide year-round forage and shelter for many resident and migratory birds. Passerines and raptors are are often found in the thickets along the base of the dike, the small marsh adjacent to the playground, and the many deciduous and evergreen trees. Scan the Columbia River (Lake Wallula) and the park lagoon for loons, grebes, waterfowl and the occasional shorebird. Walk the nature trail along the edge of the extensive marshland in the undeveloped portion of the park for additional sightings. Walk the park areas as well as the nature trail. Check the White Alder trees where winter finches (American Goldfinch, Pine Siskin and occasional Common Redpoll) are found.

See alsoABirder's Guide to Washington, Page 349

For historical information about Two Rivers Park, you may wish to visitThe English River website's page
Two Rivers Park which relates this area to Lewis & Clarks' route.